About

The Bouldering Epigrammetrists are two friends, Astrid Schmölzer and Sarah Lang, from the University of Graz and we both are somewhat ‘unusual’ species in our respective fields. Astrid is the archaeologist in an (digital) Ancient History project on (Roman) Epigraphy. Before she started dealing with inscriptions and stones, she did her MA thesis in Archaeology on artificial cranial deformation in Austria. She also did a MA in Ancient History and Classics, working on early Arianism. Sarah only did her BA in Archaeology as a hobby. She is a Latinist by education, but ended up in the Digital Humanities (mostly working on neo-latin alchemy). Programming has become an important part of her life.

Watch us rise. 😉 Climbing is our new hobby and one way of getting some good energy, do sports and be social. No easy task, if you are a phd student…

We currently prepare a project grant on 3D modeling using digital photogrammetry (structure from motion) for epigraphy. The 3D models are supposed to be more than just visualizations and reconstructions – we try to explore how actual scientific knowledge can be generated from them (i.e. making text readable which is practically invisible to the human eye, etc.).

While not in the same field, we share the same circle of friends and the passion for stones. Not only historical ones with inscriptions on them, but also rock climbing and bouldering. Apart from that, we’re both writers who enjoy blogging as a form not strictly academic writing which can sometimes tend to kill the fun in writing with excessive reviewing, etc. When blogging and climbing together, we realized how crucial active recreation, rest and work-life balance are to our productivity in academia. This is why we want to include this aspect in our blog as well.

The subjects we blog on range from (digital) archaeology, (digital) classics, (digital) humanities, the academic jetset, PhD life, work-life balance, time management when writing our PhDs, conferences, and how adventure, travel and vagabonding are often combined in archaeology (i.e. climbing the walls of a medieval castle in the name of archaeology, or learning to dive for underwater archaeology).

Loving bones, climbing stones. Stories of everyday phdlife