Book review – QGIS Map Design by Anita Graser & Gretchen N. Peterson

While finally doing my revisions and corrections on my dissertation text, I spend my last days of work (meaning work I am actually getting paid for) on maps. In our project, we are working on different names of deities and it would be nice to give a summary to all those names and – a distributional map.

So, I built the map – when there will be enough time, I hope to do a proper tutorial on that – and I collected the data and now I am sitting here in front of my screen … and I do not know how to actually design a proper map, with a layout, with a meaning. It seems rather rude to myself saying that I have not a clue how to do map design, because I am quite fit with the software and I can handle my data quite well.

I know that I need a distributional map as well as a map where I can show how many objects have been located in my known finding spots. I started googleing around on map design and then I found it: “QGIS Map Design, Second Edition (for more information click here), by Anita Graser & Gretchen N. Peterson, with new and updated workflows for QGIS 3.4.

QGIS 3.4 is the current long term release (LTR) and available for Windows, Mac and Linux. I am now working on Windows with QGIS 3.10, and there are not so many differences to 3.4, so I am quite good with it. And I have to say, it actually never crashed: 3.10 works fine as well.

But now, the review: Actually, the book is designed like one of those nice programming recipe books you may know. Its build up in three main parts: Layer Styling, Labeling and Print Map Design.

By flipping through the pages of this book it is possible to gain an understanding of the wide variety of mapping possibilities within QGIS. These pages provide in-depth, step-by-step instructions on how to create the maps shown, a variety of genereal cartographic techniques, and plenty of design inspiration. – p. 205

On more than 200 pages there is a collection of different maps and layouts, focusing on the further use of the map and the shown data. I found this book at our university library and I flipped through it in my coffee break – and I was convinced by chapter 3 that this was the book I needed desperately.

I am no tech native, I am no programmer and I am a learning-on-the-job archaeologist trying to give a proper geographic insight on our project work. A map is like a picture – it tells you a whole story and answers a certain question.

So, when getting started with the tutorials described in the book, I first downloaded the ressources accompanying the tutorials. I played around on various examples. The descriptions are step-by-step and easy to follow. As with all technical stuff, the key to understanding is reading your instructions calmly and concentrated. I was quite impressed by my results and on the next day I started immediately to try the techniques on my own data – you see a glimpse of one of my maps I am going to use for my dissertation project in the header.

I discovered a whole new world beyond the the functions of QGIS I am now quite used to. I suddenly felt a new interest in trying things and I understood the way to think and work with my data so that there will be proper and effective results.

You should have some basic training in QGIS, but there are enough ressources online and as books to get you into the material and the fun part of it. I am still impressed by the great simplicity of the explanations and the possibilities you have as a user of the whole package data you can work on.

So, from one happy noob to the world of academic warriors, especially those in need of nice map designs – try the examples and tutorials in this book! It will change your life!

Have a great time experiencing the wonderous world of QGIS!

Yours,

Astrid 🙂


You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.